Vane on test – A boy, a crow and a big problem

Special reports, analysis, and background information for the role-playing genre’s heroes, hobby generals, and single-player enthusiasts – from professionals who are aware of the games being played. Benefits: Vane is somewhat like self-twisting forks for …

Special reports, analysis, and background information for the role-playing genre’s heroes, hobby generals, and single-player enthusiasts – from professionals who are aware of the games being played. Benefits:

Vane is somewhat like self-twisting forks for spaghetti: at first glance, it seems like a great concept with an enticing premise; however, in reality, because of an inability to coordinate the mechanism, the splashes over the wallpaper in moments.

The mood is tense

In the film, however, Vane starts quite positive: In a massive storm, we make our lives as little boys in a shelter; however, its inhabitants smash the door into our faces. The image turns black, and a loading screen later, we are suddenly flying like a raven over a vast sun-drenched desert—a welcome and unexpected contrast to the dull final time scene from the opening scene.

The two scenes stand pretty different from the other, yet they reveal the reason for all the buzz around the indie game following the initial trailers: A solitary and sometimes hostile environment that is in the process of degeneration or is already composed of rubble. What we are, how it happened, what has transpired,, and what’s to come are not told by the classic narratives or the world itself.

It’s similar to successful titles such as Journey, which also operate without many words. In Journey, the designers at Vane focused on conveying emotion. And they succeed within the first few minutes.

The raven mentioned above flies as a tiny glider. With a vast landscape to practice in an environment, a sense of the bird is possible without any issues. We look for a sparkling spot in the distance and find that the initial puzzle piece is right there. We must gather other birds in our vicinity to collaborate to take to the ground an older weathercock.

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Once we have found the first raven’s nest, it appears in another place and shows us how to fly. As we follow one blinking dot one after the other, we discover how the raven navigates itself and can solve the desert puzzle without feeling confined by the hand (or, more accurately, the wings). The flight through the dunes can be tranquil and makes us want to sleep.

Like a hippo in jello

The game ends with a glittering gold-colored substance on the ground, transforming us into adults. Instead of flying around with sparkling wings, we tap across children’s feet. It’s already less accessible because the child walks around like the hippo squirting in Jello. Particularly on large surfaces, the brat is often so slow that we’d love to have the wings we had back.

But, the absence of mobility has a significant advantage: instead of being wingless, we have hands and operate switches, allowing us to open doors. Between the bird and the child, we can switch between the two whenever we want. The bird transforms into a child due to gold dust scattered at specific points, while the child is transformed into a bird when we drop it down an incline.

It may sound a bit harsh initially; however, it is also a way to save a child’s life when we take an unnecessary step. The two main characters have their function. We quickly learn: play through the bird’s eyes or play as a child.

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