The first Pokémon Sword & Shield DLC in review: Many monsters, little content

Special background, reports, and analyses for role-playing characters, hobby generals, and single-player enthusiasts. Experts who understand the game being played. Your benefits: All the new content in the DLC in an encapsulated view A variety …

Special background, reports, and analyses for role-playing characters, hobby generals, and single-player enthusiasts. Experts who understand the game being played. Your benefits:

All the new content in the DLC in an encapsulated view

A variety of, yet muddy, open space

In contrast to the main game, the player no longer wanders through linear hoses of levels in the DLC. Instead, we enter a seamless open world that allows us to move the camera in any direction. The whole Armor Isle is now basically an enormous natural area in Sword and Shield only consisted of a small space.

This allows the game’s DLC world to feel freer than before. In the beginning, we aren’t thinking about beginning the story’s new campaign in the first place; rather, first, we pedal our Rotom bike for a few hours to tour the island in depth.

In terms of pure area, Armor Island is about the same size as its main Nature Zone, but it’s more diverse. We walk through vast beaches and grasslands, explore caverns and cave networks, and then fight to survive a massive desert, where sandstorms raging and impede our view.

More than 100 New Pokemon

With its massive collection of Poke returned players, This DLC is particularly appealing to players who played the game in the early days and inspired an interest in collecting right from the beginning. As you progress through the process of filling up the Pokedex with the various creatures we’ve missed in the main game is the most enjoyable part of the whole expansion. Since, in terms of plot, The Isle of Armor offers very little.

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Mini-story with lots of grinds

In contrast to The main campaign, we do not visit any arenas within the DLC in this game. However, we instead wander through the doorway into Master Mastrich’s school. This accepts us as a student new to the dojo and gives us new assignments throughout the course of our campaign.

Once we’ve done this, we will take care of our adorable new battle partner Dakuma throughout the remaining part of our story. The term “take charge” here refers to “dull grind” and “artificial game time-stretching” First, we’ll take care of Master Maastricht for roughly 30 minutes to boost Dakuma’s friendship by fighting , and then slavishly cook curry in Poke-Camping.

In the next step, we will have two hours left to get our Dakuma trained, which is available when we reach level 10. and up to level 70. (!). Then, we can complete the last test in the DLC. The test is to fight our to or both the Tower of Unlight and the Tower of Water with our legendary companion. Then, based on the tower we select and the level we choose, we’ll transform Dakuma at the top of the building to become a Waluosu using one of the Unlight and the Water type. Following that is the ultimate battle where we’ll meet Hop again and engage in several fights. This is the end of it for the campaign.

The main game has been in play since November. Most trainers have the advantage of having a strong team of Pokemon. That’s why most of the battles that are part of the DLC will be boring for the players. It is that unless players deliberately make the game more difficult by deploying a squad of weaker Pokemon.

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Dull Digda Search

Alongside the main campaign, the DLC also includes a few additional quests. For instance, there are 151 Alola Digdas that have been lost (or, better, they are in a grave) throughout Armor Island, and we must find the buried ones.

This is only suitable for people who collect Poke.

Anyone expecting an elaborate story with many obstacles in The Isle of Armor will be disappointed.

The DLC, however, on the contrary, is only relevant to all trainers looking to indulge their love for collecting and pack more than 99 hyper balls in their pockets, filling their Pokedex with the numerous returning Pokemon.

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