Test: Yuki (Arcade Action)

Nothing suits VR as much as direct motion control, especially when you are holding the constantly firing hero in your palm as if you were an action model. Valve has noticed this already within The …

Nothing suits VR as much as direct motion control, especially when you are holding the constantly firing hero in your palm as if you were an action model. Valve has noticed this already within The Lab or the makers of Shooty Skies Overdrive. This is the VR shooter Yuki however, takes the concept to a whole new level.

Welcom back to Fantasy Zone!
Amiga users may remember an aha moment similar to this one that saw them suddenly be able to move the hero floating out of Space Harrier directly using the mouse. Because of the innovative technology, high-speed maneuvers for evasion were possible after dragons or wild Moai statues began to spew the flames. The shooter rogue-lite Yuki brings back the feeling immediately. However, the concept is elevated to a whole new level since I’m personally caught in the chaos of bullets. The most important thing is that the heroine Yuki isn’t hit by anything. Her bullet-ridden friend “Pod” and me, as the gamer, are both immune to the projectiles that are colorful since they are, after all.

If I choose the left- or right-handed option, I place Yuki with my dominant hands, while the world of linear games comes at me as in an arcade game – at a slow pace, comfortably, and with no nausea. Once the devil dragons and wolf heads start firing, I weave Yuki across the glowing gunfire, swathed in wild skirmishes. Videos or words cannot adequately describe its pleasure to plunge into red waves or gracefully slide through multiple “screwdrivers” which slowly drift towards me. Brazilian creator Arvore (Pixel Ripped) has created an exquisite version of Japanese folklore and spaced out the strangeness in space this time.

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The sound of cats and the sounds of air.

At times, indestructible stone cats hiss in Yuki’s direction; a short time later, a clattering wooden mask recalls a smoker’s party trick: In the course of the beautifully orchestrated boss fight, it blows lightning-fast rings of bullets through slow circles – adding even more speed to the dance of death. Diogo Rodrigues’ soundtrack gave me goosebumps all through. Its melancholic to euphoric tunes reminded me of the rave and hardtrance classics from RMB and Raver’s Nature. The plot, however, is not a massive part of the story. The villainous Yokaliens wish to take”the “Creative Drive” from the Star-Flower, to create destruction and chaos. I’d instead take the blue capsules by myself to stop this from happening.

I’m always amazed at how much faster I got at avoiding hundreds of bullets when the controls are simple, and there’s just a few square feet along the sides for avoiding. If I do it too much, I’ll have to use the boundary grids on the sides to stop me. However, the”real” space makes for a much less frustrating experience than when playing tough-hitting Bullet Hell games on an overcrowded 2D screen. This is made possible by the unstoppable sidekick “pod” on my left hand that I can use to take objects. The creators have created a delightful but complex combination of their rogue-lite style. Despite the numerous assaults, you can find theme levels, such as a classic-looking Far Eastern city or a lantern forest located in space. There are plenty of distinctive characteristics that you’ll wish to try again and again after having failed.

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