Pokémon: Let’s Go, Pikachu in review – Switch adventure with a lot of heart

Special reports, analysis, and background information for heroes of the role-playing genre as well as hobby generals and single-player players – by experts who are aware of the games being played. Your benefits: Is it …

Special reports, analysis, and background information for heroes of the role-playing genre as well as hobby generals and single-player players – by experts who are aware of the games being played. Your benefits:

Is it possible for Pokemon Let’s Go to keep its original appeal despite a rather drastic overhaul to the catching system? Or will Let’s Go ultimately not want to be as “old” Pokemon?

Pokemon Let’s Go Pikachu is, in essence, it’s a blend of both old and modern. Older because it’s based on the games of the first generation, and more specifically , the Yellow Edition, which hit the market in 1998 for the Game Boy Color.

We’re still competing with arena lords, making monsters battle monsters using the rock-paper-scissors concept, and collecting and training creatures in pockets to become among the top.

In this case, we can choose among the Pikachu and Evoli editions, both of which are the same in content , except for the partner Pokemon (Pikachu or Evoli). We tested the Pikachu version for our test.

Dream(ato)beautiful

It’s a new game since Let’sGo takes significant steps forward both mechanically and visually. At least visually, it’s clear that they’re heading in the correct direction.

Technology is much more advanced than it was a mere 20 years ago. We have a Switch within our bedrooms instead of the Super Nintendo, and passersby on the street inform us that they can connect the console to our mobile.

While we’re there, the familiar Alabastia track is recorded by an orchestra. The Kanto region is stretched out in front of us in vivid color and crisp HD textures. After all, we’re no more playing with Nintendo’s Game Boy but on the Switch.

For anyone who grew up taking place before or during the 90s, the first stroll across Alabastia is a blend of familiarity and the excitement of discovering something fresh.

Pay attention to where you step

However, even the youngest players who have only seen Pokemon in color are likely to be awestruck when they spot Rattfratz and Myrapla running around the thick grass. Or when they stumble on an angry Raupi during walking.

The Pokemon are shown in true scale, which means that they are scaled to the exact size, so a Rattfratz is tiny, and an Onyx nearly doesn’t make sense in the image. Douglas shoots up from the ground, and Tentoxa is almost like an island in its small size as it glides across the water, partially obscured.

In the end, places such as the Vertania Forest and those on the Seafoam Islands look considerably more lively than they did previously. In addition, buildings such as the arenas and those at the Pokemon Center have received a revamped design by putting posters on the walls, magazine racks , and many other things.

Additionally, there are other gameplay improvements because of the new Switch home. For instance, it is now possible to play directly with our companion Pokemon by tickling it, poking it , or feeding it with berries.

To trigger the Pikachu action, there’s an additional item on the menu as in the previous version; however, in this case, we don’t like before – just brush Pokemon who have become slightly dusty following the battle, but instead take care of our pet.

High Five!

It’s also important since our Pikachu reacts to events everywhere around it. For instance, it’s afraid by the sight of Lavandia’s ghostly tower and then calms when we hug it. Perhaps the child is exhausted after a battle with an arena boss and is waiting to be rewarded with a high-five.

We also keep searching for new costumes so that you can outfit Pikachu and ourselves in an appropriate way for any event. For instance, we haven’t changed Pikachu’s formal dress for the entirety of the game, as it makes him appear like a mob boss.

These seem like small things at first glance, but they can make us feel more involved in the game and extremely satisfied, for instance, when Pikachu presents us with a stunning stone that it discovered on the way. The stone won’t be sold during the duration of the game, no matter if it will make the inventory messier or it doesn’t.

In addition, our close relationship with our companion is not always smiling, and sometimes we are sad. If Pikachu loses a fight, for instance, and then comes back to us crying in pain, we’re distraught.

Anyone awed by the heartbreaking story about Tragosso and his mother sad at the time should be prepared with tissues in anticipation of this HD Version (including the facial expressions!)

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