Film review: Joker

When Warner announced the release of a Joker film featuring a new cast , and no Batman in the first place, following the somewhat mixed DC lineup over the past couple of years, it raised …

When Warner announced the release of a Joker film featuring a new cast , and no Batman in the first place, following the somewhat mixed DC lineup over the past couple of years, it raised a few eyebrows. However, the expectations soared when it became clear who would play the infamous clown and how the comic would be presented. As a result, the Joker is in the picture and causing more chaos than any other film in the past.

Content

Arthur Fleck lives with his elderly mother in a slum in the city wilderness in Gotham City. He struggles to maintain his head above water, working as a hired clown; however, he is awed by the job and affected by a condition that makes him laugh out of control when stressed and a deeply-rooted sadness that never goes away, He is obsessed with the thought of making people smile. However, his quirky behavior, as well as the city that is sinking into ever more social turmoil, continue to get him in trouble.

A gang assaults him to have amusement, his coworkers take him down wherever they can, and his comedy ambitions are met with humiliation. If his counselor discloses that there will not be further sessions due to budget cuts and the medication he takes will be discontinued, Arthur slowly but surely loses his hold and begins to lose himself in his fantasies. Finally, if a dramatic incident happens on a late-night train ride and the last one binds Arthur to the community he is a part of, he is forced to become a completely new, extremely dangerous individual.

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(center) JOAQUIN PHOENIX as Arthur Fleck in Warner Bros. Pictures, Village Roadshow Pictures, and BRON Creative’s “JOKER,” a Warner Bros. Pictures release.

KRITIK

It’s obvious: Joker is an action film. It is not a superhero film and certainly not an action-packed thriller. It’s a psychodrama that follows a person who has been able to live his entire life amid the abyss and then crashes through an array of unfortunate and unfair circumstances. He carries everything he can pull down to the ground. The audience is privy to each painful step along the path of insanity. This is the essence of the debate that surrounds the film. There isn’t a hero, and there is no other identifiable figure. All the suffering and humiliation Arthur must endure evokes some sympathy or even pity; however, there is never sympathy. Since at all times, it’s clear that we’re dealing with an extremely disturbed person who can be any thing. The fact that the camera records only his view every moment only intensifies the feeling of unease.

The film’s tough balance act to the lead star, Joaquin Phoenix. The actor has proven on numerous occasions that he’s one of the most outstanding performers of the present. However, He creates an example that will be discussed for a long time. Afraid and ugly, He completely disappears into this pathetic man who spirals more and more into the abyss. He is the one who, despite the awful incidents that occur to Arthur, does not allow you to choose to take sides with him in the way you would with his body language or facial expressions. The dark shadow behind his eyes is black, his smile is too big, and that little tick is too fake to be his gestures.

JOAQUIN PHOENIX in Arthur Fleck in Warner Bros. Pictures, Village Roadshow Pictures, and BRON Creative’s “JOKER,” a Warner Bros. Pictures release.

Film lovers might be thinking at this point, “Doesn’t this look familiar from someplace?” They’re correct. Over 40 years ago, this story did exist before, but in Martin Scorsese’s Taxi Driver.Although it focused on an entirely different character with a distinct backstory, The films are pretty similar in the plot, concept, and visual language. This is an unsubstantiated point of criticism. The film is there Joker had enough originality to give the impression of not being considered plagiarism. But Todd Phillips has overdone the idea a bit due to his obvious affection for the period and the master’s work. To create a more significant than a mere copy of a film is something else, but to use the model on a regular basis is a different matter. It’s hard to get rid of the idea that the director could attempt to make something similar to a faithful remake forcefully.

One example could be role for Robert De Niro in a minor but crucial supporting role. He gives a stellar performance, and so do the rest actors, but they are all mediocre compared to the version of Phoenix. Despite apparent resemblances to the (also highly controversial) film of the same name, Joker remains an excellent film. Having to tell an epic story in an approach that the audience can follow along with isn’t a difficult task. It is even more tragic in the reality that the whole discussion about the film revolves around its portrayal of violence and the possible consequences for the viewer. However, it is attempting to raise entirely different issues, including how to address mental illness in society daily or social injustice. This is, unfortunately, absent in the intense (and unproductive, as it’s been ongoing for years) debate about the portrayals of violence.

Not to mention lastly, it’s important to say how the film’s technical design of the film is top-quality. It’s Gotham City in Joker is reminiscent of a 1980s New York, looking grimy and filthy, yet is nonetheless captured in bizarrely gorgeous photographs by the director photographer Lawrence Sher. Phillips, directed by Sher, is fantastically done, though, as I said earlier, the film is perhaps a bit too inspired by the classic. Stunt and special effects work are not used much however, it’s a fantastic job. Another great thing about the film is the music score. The atonal string tones enhance the film’s mood and beat with classics from the 1960s and 50s that were primarily performed by great entertainers, exactly as Arthur would like.

JOAQUIN PHOENIX in the role of Joker on Warner Bros. Pictures, Village Roadshow Pictures, and BRON Creative’s “JOKER,” a Warner Bros. Pictures release.

FAZIT

Todd Phillips takes Christoper Nolan’s method of putting a real-life twist on this comic to its max. Joker is not a comic book. Joker appears to be an adaptation of a comic book that, in fact, isn’t. The film uses the role of the legendary Batman antagonist and weaves an epic story around his life, and apologizes for any references to the comic book. The result is a gruesome and disturbing psychological drama that is led by the stunning performance of the main actor and poses some critical questions about the current state of our culture. The reality, it Joker just barely manages to stay clear of becoming an uninvoluntary remake of a well-known classic an itch at the fantastic overall impression.

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