Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy in review – Triple retro dose on Xbox One & Switch

Special background, reports, and analyses for gamers, role-playing generals, and fans of single-player games expert opinion from those who understand what’s happening in the game. Your benefits: The most interesting feature is the Switch version, …

Special background, reports, and analyses for gamers, role-playing generals, and fans of single-player games expert opinion from those who understand what’s happening in the game. Your benefits:

The most interesting feature is the Switch version, which, as we know, has significantly less hardware power on the plastic side of its ribs.

The familiar old problem

On Nintendo’s hybrid console, the animal protagonist has to leave behind a few hairs of the fur. Although the developers keep the 30 frames in place throughout the Switch, the resolution has been reduced from 1080p down to 720p in TV mode. If you pull the console from its docking station, the game is only 480p, even though certain effects have been saved.

As Crash’s fur appears less fluffy, the explosions are tiny flame clouds, and some reflections are not visible in the environment. Also, the textures are washed out, and a narrower visual range. Any technical trick that can save resources. It’s even more confusing that we must endure blurry images when using handheld mode.

This greatly diminishes the quality of the graphics in Crash’s remake. However, Crash remains a solid image for the Switch. The integrated motion blur conceals the lower resolution somewhat and the clear user interface and the short time to load are a welcome relief.

Take advantage of bite-sized portions

In terms of gameplay, however, the remake trilogy is similar to the smile on Crash’s face. The game’s levels are no more than five minutes long and can be enjoyed in small bites, particularly since saves are frequently made between each level, and you have no loss of progress.

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The various stages are ideal for a quick Jump& Run snack between the stages, even if the nutty difficulty isn’t to be undervalued.

The controls are as well-balanced as the other consoles. Crash responds somewhat sluggishly in certain areas, but it’s not because of the difficult Joy-Con.

Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy does not yet offer a capture feature on the Switch, as the touchscreen isn’t employed either. Furthermore, Vicarious Visions also misses the opportunity to implement co-op functionality on the Switch, even though two mini-controllers can offer that.

Despite the graphic sacrifices, twirling and jumping is an enjoyable experience on Nintendo’s console. Those who have waited in anticipation of the mobile version won’t be dissatisfied.

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